Thursday, September 11, 2014

Mindset: Fixed vs Growth

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Dr. Carol Dweck of Stanford University has been studying people’s mindsets towards learning for decades. She has found that most people adhere to one of two mindsets: fixed or growth. Fixed mindsets mistakenly believe that people are either smart or not, that intelligence is fixed by genes. People with growth mindsets correctly believe that capability and intelligence can be grown through effort, struggle and failure.

 

For instance, praising someone’s process (“I really like how you struggled with that problem”) versus praising an innate trait or talent (“You’re so clever!”) is one way to reinforce a growth ­mindset with someone.

 

The Learning Myth: Why I'll Never Tell My Son He's Smart

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

When it comes to new features, “NO” should be your default answer.

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As a tech lead I see my primary contribution as saying “no” to features that co-workers think are important but can’t justify. The real trick is knowing when a new feature adds linear complexity (its own weight only) or geometric complexity (interacts with other features). Both should be avoided, but the latter requires extra-convincing justification.

-Norris Numbers

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

D-day landings scenes in 1944 and now.

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Peter Macdiarmid has taken photographs of locations in France and England to match with archive images taken before, during and after the D-day landings. The Allied invasion to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi occupation during the second world war took place on 6 June 1944. Operation Overlord was the largest seaborne invasion in military history, with more than 156,000 Allied troops storming the beaches of France.

The Guardian

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Friday, May 30, 2014

Learning to Learn

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I have been teaching programming, software engineering one way or another since I have graduated. One thing I see again and again with bright kids. It is not they have good memory or high intelligence; it is that they have figured out how to learn. If I can teach my son only one thing, that would be this,

Learn to learn.